Profile of Michigan assistant Conor Ford

There was change in the coaching staff in Ann Arbor, just as there was in Detroit. The Wolverines’ is a little more straightforward, an offensive coordinator swap.

Michigan lost top assistant Ryan Danehy to an opportunity with 3D Rising, but the Maize and Blue managed to snag a strong replacement in Drexel’s Conor Ford. Ford’s offenses with the Dragons were good, but just how good?

The Profile of Output

We begin with his most recent tenure, at Drexel. He has spent the past five years there. The seaosn before Ford’s arrival is noted in italics, those for which he was coordinating the Dragons’ offensive unit in bold.

Year Record Possessions Goals Efficiency
2009 7-8 472 123 .261
2010 10-5 490 159 .324
2011 8-6 449 158 .352
2012 8-8 479 151 .315
2013 11-4 501 182 .363
2014 13-5 631 209 .331

So, that’s a marked improvement in the first year, more improvement the next year, before settling in around the mid-.350s or so. It is worth noting that he wasn’t the only new coach at Drexel in 2010 – the whole staff turned over, with new headman Brian Voelker taking over. Still, the offense was Ford’s domain, and it was good. The Dragons were in the top-20 offensively (when adjusted for strength of schedule) each of his seasons, with two top-ten finishes.

Prior to Drexel, Ford was an assistant at Penn, where again he was the offensive coordinator. The Quakers don’t have archived stats back that far, unfortunately, so another data point (where he was again coaching under Voelker) is unavailable.

Getting it Done

How has Ford been successful? Let’s look at who his top individuals have been.

All-conference selections during his time at Drexel include Nick Trizano (attack), Ben McIntosh (midfield), Ryan Belka (midfield), Aaron Prosser (midfield), Robert Church (attack), Kyle Bergman (midfield), Scott Perri (attack), and Colin Ambler (attack). That’s a nice distribution across the two units.

Indeed, that’s been the case in individual years, with leading scorers across both positions. Of note, he doesn’t seem to ever have a true feeder – and the offense isn’t particularly assist-heavy in general – so that’s one important stylistic note. Does a team like Michigan with less talent than many of its opponents have the opportunity to win with one-man offense like that? Or is Ford’s offense more adaptable to the talent? Those are two quaestions that can’t be answered until we see the product on the field.

His MGoBlue profile points out his man-up success in a couple places, but from looking at the five-year track record, it’s been good-not-great on average. There have been strong years, and some lean years, like many teams.

Recruiting

Ford has a pedigree as a player (both collegiately at Hopkins and professionally in Philly and New Jersey) that gives him a wide range of connections that could be of assistance in getting recruits out of some major hotbed areas. Along with Long Island/Upstate New York, that’s basically every territory you could want to cover when it comes to the traditional talent pools.

Michigan has seemed to focus more on Baltimore/DC than Long Island/Upstate New York in that region of the country, and they’re also doing well nationally. Ford’s presence on the staff only helps there.

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Coaching Change: Detroit

Both D-1 teams in the state had some degree of coaching change this offseason. Let’s explore! Starting with Detroit…

Out with the Old

In a surprising turn of events May 30, the only head coach Detroit has ever known resigned. From the initial press release, there wasn’t much detail as to why:

DETROIT (5/30/14) – University of Detroit Mercy men’s lacrosse coach Matt Holtz announced today (Friday, May 30) his resignation after six seasons as the Titans’ head coach. Holtz compiled a 26-60 overall record and a 15-17 mark in MAAC play during his tenure.

In his penultimate season, UDM made the NCAA tournament for the first time in program history, and though the Titans never seemed to take the next step to become a consistent MAAC contender, it certainly didn’t seem like they were on the verge of losing their coach, either.

In with the New

To fill Holtz’s place, Detroit did what seemed (to me, at least) to be obvious in promoting top assistant and defensive coordinator Chris Kolon to the head job. He took the position on an interim basis June 2, and formally accepted the permanent position July 14.

Kolon led Titans recruiting efforts during his time as the defensive coordinator, and the Titan defense was consistently good once the Division I talent arrived, the one area of the program that was outside of the bottom of the nation on a regular basis (other units, including the offense, had a year here and there among the realm of the competent).

To fill the assistant coaching vacancy created by Kolon’s promotion, UDM hired Jeff Turner to coach special teams (some of which – basically all except the man-up – could use some work) and faceoffs (which could definitely use the work). That certainly seems to imply Kolon will continue coordinating his own defense, with Graham Adams continuing as the offensive coordinator.

What it Means

Here’s a look at Detroit’s overall tempo-free ratings on offense, defense, and possession over the past five seasons:

Year Offense Defense Poss% Overall
2010 50 49 50 53 (of 59)
2011 46 17 51 42 (of 60)
2012 51 34 55 50 (of 61)
2013 55 23 42 48 (of 63)
2014 56 22 48 47 (of 67)

Interactive Whiteboards by PolyVision

That’s a lot of middling-or-better defenses (and, despite the fact that they’re going against poor offenses on a regular basis, the schedule adjustment accounts for that), and a lot of offenses/possession games that are… not good.

Assuming Kolon’s ability to install and have his players execute a solid defensive gameplan doesn’t suffer from the ascension to the top spot – there’s no reason to believe that’s the case, but it’s a possibility with more on his plate – that side of the ball should continue to do well.

Now the Titans have an assistant dedicated to improving their special teams at the very least there will be someone whose primary job is to focus on a struggling faceoff unit and clear. Whether Turner can improve those units is unknown (as a student assistant at Michigan, his impact was buried in a lesser role), but there is someone dedicated to doing just that.

One of Turner’s biggest contributions could be an improvement in the amount and type of statistical data the Titans will use in their gameplans, practices, and player development. At Michigan, one of his largest impacts (albeit from an outsiders perspective) was in developing and implementing some advanced statistical techniques – including some that overlap with Tempo-Free Lacrosse principles – to help the Wolverines’ program use every bit of data they could. The Detroit program has been underdeveloped in focusing on that side of things, so there’s room to make a quick impact there.

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Requiem for a Season: Michigan Wolverines 2014

What is blog? (Baby don’t hurt me). Slowly getting around to some of the usual offseason posts, trying to get caught up… eventually.

Michigan took strides once again between the 2013 and 2014 seasons. They climbed from the TFL-ranked No. 61 (of 63) the previous spring, up to No. 48 (of 67). They made major gains in some respects, stagnated in others, and without a nice finish to the season, might have even taken a step back in one or two areas.

It’s still a young program, and last year’s squad in particular was hit by a greater-than-average injury bug. If you told me a team was going to lose its top goalie and a starting defender before the year, I’ expect that side of the ball to struggle. U-M turned it on later in the season to bring some respectability.

Let’s take a quick look at the Wolverines’ statistical profile:

Michigan Wolverines 2014
Michigan Opponents
Faceoff Wins 202 Faceoff Wins 209
Clearing 276-311 Clearing 260-309
Possessions 562 Possessions 553
Goals 157 Goals 201
Offensive Efficiency .279
.293 adj
Offensive Efficiency .363
.358 adj

Michigan managed to possess the ball more than opponents for the first time in program history, and that played a big part in the team’s improvement from 1-13 to 5-11. They also improved offensively, and held their own at times defensively.

What Went Well

Sophomore midfielder Kyle Jackson became Michigan’s first All-ECAC first-team selection, and played a big role in the team’s leap forward on offense. He was relied upon less to do everything for U-M, and was more comfortable as a key player, not the key player on O. He was helped there by a fellow goal-stuffer in freshman attack Ian King. King was strictly a finisher for Michigan this year (32 goals, one assist), but led the team in scoring and should have a more diverse role in due time.

Faceoffs have been an adventure at times for Michigan, and nearing the .500 mark is a definite sign of improvement. Brad Lott was more consistent (though the occasional 4/15 or 7/20 game needs to be hammered out), and the wing play improved, despite Michigan’s injuries among wing players.

Defensively, Michigan took a big hit by losing Gerald Logan to shoulder surgery before the season (and starting pole Charlie Keady to injury, and several players on defense for a few games here and there), but managed to get things together by the end of the season. Freshman netminder Robbie Zonino improved greatly over the course of the season, and the unit was solid by the end of the year. There are strides yet to go, but U-M is on track.

The injury bug emphasized Michigan’s adaptability over the year. Sure, you’d like to see the Maize and Blue go with their top players at each position wire-to-wire, but that’s not going to happen. In a season where that was never the case, they tinkered with lineups and prepared understudies to get on the field. Further adapting with position changes (for example Brendan Gaughan moving from attack to midfield, and rounding into a useful player at his new position by the end of the year) staved off any form of complacency – as much as a sub-.500 team can grow complacent – and showed that the future is bright when all the pieces are in place.

Room for Improvement

Just about everything can improve for Michigan, including the record (and the tempo-free ranking, which was still in the bottom third nationally). Taking steps in the right direction is not the same as arriving at the destination.

U-M playing fully healthy is out of the question, but playing with fewer of its top-line options out, including Logan and Keady – needs to happen to reach the goals of this team. There’s no strength and conditioning program that can totally avoid injury, but developing further depth so that, at the very least, the dropoff is less severe, will be a key.

I alluded to this above, but Michigan’s improvement on faceoffs came with some real clunkers from time to time. Continuing to approach consistency with Lott and other specialists – while working with wings to win a greater percentage of the 50/50 balls – will help keep games within reach.

Speaking of those 50/50 balls, Michigan still lost the GB battle on the year (471-490), and that’s something where talent will help improve things.

It’s tough to harp on Michigan’s defense given the personnel losses, but it was… still not good. Robbie Zonino’s improvement over the course of the year was notable (see chart), but never got his cumulative save percentage up to .500. Gerald Logan finished the previous year at .563 on a worse defense. Both the outfield players and the goalie have room for improvement. Playing the “statistical manipulation that doesn’t work” game, if Zonino had saved as great a percentage of shots faced as Logan the previous year, U-M would have allowed eight fewer goals on the year.

Robbie Zonino Save Percentage

Robbie Zonino Save Percentage, game-to-game in blue and cumulative in red.

The Distant Future

Michigan’s talent influx continues: the Wolverines signed a top-20 recruit in goalie Tommy Heidt, and added another top-100 player in longpole Hugh Mosko. Add in several players returning from injury, and the addition of UMass transfer Aaron Madaisky, and the depth situation on defense won’t be as dire this year. The Maize and Blue have a chance – and a good one – to turn that into production.

Michigan’s club holdovers have given a lot to the program, and probably performed above the level expected of them. That said, with a few exceptions, most of them are probably wouldn’t be playing with the types of recruiting classes Michigan is bringing in. The talent influx is the theme of this program, and probably has two more years (Michigan’s “first recruiting class,” the 2012 freshman group, was not compiled with the promise of playing at the D-1 level secured) before the idea of what this program will be manifests itself.

That said, Michigan’s young Division-1 recruits are adding experience. Whether it’s the first class – who will be seniors in the fall – or the first full D-1 class, there’s finally an upperclassman on this roster recruited to play at this level. The coaches implementing training and gameplans to prepare those players to reach their potential is just as big.

That’s one area where I think the loss of offensive coordinator Ryan Danehy will hurt. From all appearances – statistically, eyeball test, and otherwise – he was the real deal. From improving players’ fundamentals to getting a plan together to win games (or at least come as close as talent and execution would let things get), he’s a loss. How much new OC Conor Ford will be able to fill that gap is as-yet an unknown – one that I’ll be exploring more in the future. It’s possible that he outperforms even the high bar Danehy set. It’s also possible that he can’t live up to it.

With players like Lott entering their upperclassman years, the consistency should start to hammer out. He was up-and-down (with too much down) as a freshman, balanced things out between the two extremes as a sophomore, and should be able to be more consistently positive as a junior.

All told, Michigan took a step forward in quality (if not win percentage) from year one to year two. The following offseason saw a bigger leap, including on the final record. Year four should see Michigan start to become what its long-term future is.

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Requiem for a Season: Detroit Titans 2014

Detroit’s season in 2014 wasn’t so different from the 2013 outcome. Sure, the Titans made the NCAA Tournament and gave Notre Dame a run for their money in the previous year, but it took a magical late-season run to get to that point (and said run erased some bad memories of other games earlier in the year).

This season played out basically the same, but UDM didn’t finish that first game in the MAAC Tournament to get there. Several years into the program, you’d like to see them take the next step, rather than stagnate, of course. Still, the year wasn’t a disaster nor was it a rousing success.

Regardless of all that, next year will happen with a different man in charge. Headman Matt Holtz surprisingly resigned at the end of May, and defensive coordinator Chris Kolon has ascended to the top spot.

Let’s take a quick look at the Titans’ statistical profile:

Detroit Titans 2014
Detroit Opponents
Faceoff Wins 127 Faceoff Wins 185
Clearing 227-286 Clearing 214-252
Possessions 451 Possessions 496
Goals 128 Goals 135
Offensive Efficiency .284
.261 adj
Offensive Efficiency .272
.293 adj

The Titans were actually better offensively than opponents (thanks to a goal-filler like Shayne Adams on one side, and goal-preventer Jason Weber on the other), but their deficit in possession helped lead to the disappointing 6-8 record. There’s also something to be said for doing that against the second-easiest schedule in the nation.

What Went Well

the breakout star this year for Detroit was goalie Jason Weber. He missed three games to start the year thanks to disciplinary issues, but once he got back on the field, he was nothing short of dominant. He saved .642 of shots faced, to lead the NCAA by .020 (a large margin), and did so behind a defense that was pretty good, but probably not as good as those for other top keepers. He was a revelation from the first time he stepped foot on the field, and was just a freshman. The Titans’ goalkeeping is in good hands.

Shayne Adams did the Shayne Adams thing, pouring in goals left and right. He finished with 42 on the year with 7 assists, and did so on efficient shooting (74.7% of his shots were on goal, and 42.4% scored). He’s put in positions to score, sure, but damn if he didn’t make the most of those opportunities.

Defensive depth was pretty good, with several different poles (and short-stick defensive middies) getting into the action from time to time, and building for the future. With Nick Garippa and Troy Dennis (SSDM) and Brian Smith (LSM/D) the only players leaving due to graduation from that side of the ball, the future is bright.

Room for Improvement

The name of the game is possession, and it’s a game that Detroit is not very good at. The Titans trotted out the No. 55 (of 67) faceoff unit, and the No. 63 clear. While they had an average ride, two bad units is a lot to cancel out, and they couldn’t do it. The faceoff specialists – especially Damien Hicks – seemed to show promise from game to game, but consistency there and better wing play are key.

Behind every poor possession game is a high turnover rate, and that was Detroit’s biggest struggle this year. The Titans committed 248 turnovers – that’s on 55.5% of possessions – and there’s main source of the struggles. Getting the ball from the defensive end to the offensive end, and taking care of it when you get there are necessary to putting it into the net behind the other team’s goalie.

A similar issue – and there’s some philosophical debate about how big an issue it is, if planned for – is inaccurate shooting. Mike Birney took a big step back in that respect this year. He was carrying a bit more of the offensive load, but it took him 113 shots and only 49 on goal to reach 18 scores. It doesn’t matter if a player can shoot 114 miles an hour if it’s sailing over the crossbar on worse than every other attempt.

Detroit also developed a nasty habit of playing down to their competition, without playing up to better competition frequently enough. A one-goal win over Mercer, a two-goal win over VMI, one-goal win over Wagner, five-goal loss to Marquette, loss to Manhattan… while a win is a win in most respects, closer-than-expected wins also point to the program not growing past a scrappy underdog stage, to a degree.

Despite not playing takewaway lacrosse anymore, the Titans were still fairly penalty-prone. It took a step in the right direction this season, but like with the offensive care for the ball, a small dose more discipline can lead to big improvements in games.

The Distant Future

Fortunately, a year with some growing pains should help the Titans take a step forward next year. They have to replace the majority of their defensive midfielders (though I did pick a non-starter in JD Hess for the All-GLS team at that position over graduating Garippa), a couple attackmen including primary ball-carrier Alex Maini, and… not much else.

What the Titans need is to see that talent take the next step, and translate into even better results on the field. They’ve taken baby steps in the past couple offseasons, and a larger step with Adams, Birney, D-poles Joe Gifford and Chris Shevins, and attackmen Scott Drummon and Brandon Beauregard all coming into their senior season is the expectation.

With stability in the coaching staff – Kolon was promoted to become the head coach, so the defensive philosophy (which changed from heavy-pressure to more relaxed with a ball-stopped like Weber available) won’t change much – the Titans should be able to keep plugging along the road of improvement they’ve been taking without too much of a change.

If the faceoffs and clear can just take the smallest steps toward average (something I’ve been predicting for a few years now), and the offense can become a little tighter with the ball, UDM can really turn some heads next year.

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Michigan 5, Fairfield 12

Like with the final UDM recap of the year, I’m not going into extreme detail on this game. I’ll have a bit more, since I was there to see it happen, but with a game months ago, it’s best to just recap for the sake of thoroughness and move along.

Tempo Free

From the official box score, a look at the tempo-free stats:

Fairfield 2014 ECAC Tournament
Michigan Fairfield
Faceoff Wins 7 Faceoff Wins 14
Clearing 16-18 Clearing 13-18
Possessions 30 Possessions 34
Goals 5 Goals 12
Offensive Efficiency .167 Offensive Efficiency .353

Michigan played pretty fast this year, and this was below their average. Through the first three quarters, it seemed like it would be well below average pace (40 possessions at that point), but the floodgates opened, and it turned into a lopsided, normal-paced game against a slow Fairfield team.

Notes

Brad Lott was up-and-down during the season. When he was good, he was very good. When he wasn’t, the faceoff unit as a whole naturally struggled. He was just OK on the clamp in this game, and with the other aspects of Michigan’s faceoff unit, that’s not good enough to see success. Most of Fairfield’s advantage was built up on the fourth-quarter run, but it’s a good faceoff man’s duty to help prevent those runs from happening, too. Michigan made up some of the possession deficit by being very strong on the ride, leveling things off a bit.

“We need to be consistent there,” said Michigan coach John Paul. “It’s everything, not just Brad. Our wings need to do a better job, we’re not doing a good job on 50/50 balls, and it’s something that will be a focus going into next year.”

Of course, U-M’s inability to score – and later, once the Stags got going, to prevent Fairfield from scoring – made the difference in this game. 20 of 33 shots went on goal for the Maize and Blue (nine in the second quarter, when Michigan could have captured a bit of momentum with better shot placement.

Ian King’s two goals paced the squad (one on the EMO). Brendan Gaughan’s shift to midfield at the end of the year finished well with a goal on five shots (four on goal). Goalie Robbie Zonino continued his late run of nice play with 15 saves and 12 goals allowed.

“This was Robbie’s best game of the year,” Paul said. “He didn’t change anything, and really they scored three empty-net goals [against the 10-man ride] at the end, so he actually had an amazing day. He stepped up when we needed him to step up.”

Fairfield’s run was the primary story in this one. It was anybody’s game through three quarters, with the Stags leading 5-3. Two quick goals to start the fourth set the tone, and though Michigan got one back, it seemed like that 7-3 lead would be too much to overcome, and it ballooned late when Michigan pressed a bit and couldn’t get faceoff wins.

“The gameplan coming in  was only to 10-man when they won the faceoff back,” Paul said. “Then we got behind and started 10-manning, because we knew we’re not going to get a whole lot of possessions. Once the clock was ticking, we had to start manufacturing stuff.”

U-M learned that they could hang with talented teams, but that they were still a few steps from winning many of those games. The offseason should be the difference in adding the necessary talent and developing what’s already on the roster to take that next step.

Up Next

Michigan’s season ended with a suddenness over the second half of this game, but there’s no denying it was a solid step forward for the program as a whole. Making it into the postseason is a boost (and will be tougher next year in a loaded Big Ten), and U-M can grow from that.

“I think we take a lot,” Paul said. “Our guys didn’t really approach this any differently than any other game. They came in pretty confident, and I loved our attitude coming into this game. You have to feel confident and play that way, and we were and we did.”

Moving along, I’ll decompress the season and look into the future with a new offensive coordinator and yet another signing class under the team’s belt.

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Detroit 9, Marist 11

Not going into extreme depth on this one, because 1) it was months ago 2) I didn’t get a chance to see it, and 3) with a new coach in the house, it might not apply that much to the future anyway. Writing it up for the sake of completeness/thoroughness.

Tempo Free

From the official box score, a look at the tempo-free stats:

Marist 2014 MAAC Tournament
Detroit Marist
Faceoff Wins 9 Faceoff Wins 14
Clearing 16-19 Clearing 14-14
Possessions 28 Possessions 31
Goals 9 Goals 11
Offensive Efficiency .321 Offensive Efficiency .355

This was a slow game, and Marist had the majority of the possessions thanks to facing off fairly well and riding Detroit enough to prevent any chance of making up that gap. The difference in efficiencies existed but wasn’t significant, and the possession game accounted for most of the difference.

Notes

What made this one hurt (aside from the obvious “it ended the season”) was that UDM led by two goals with four minutes left. Detroit had possession with about five minutes left, turned it over, and only touched the ball once again before the end of the game (which led to a single shot with no backup when the score was Marist 10, Detroit 9).

Turnovers – as they were for much of the season – were the story of this one, to an extent. Aside from the obvious anecdotal piece above, UDM committed 11 total in the game to Marist’s 5. Only two of the Titans’ turnovers were forced, and they didn’t cause any coming the other way. In a possession game, that razor-thin margin is the difference.

Jason Weber was strong with 16 saves and 11 goals against. It’s always tough to tell just how good the defense was around him (they play a part in forcing Marist to get off bad shots), but they didn’t stuff the statsheet, with one total GB and one turnover for the starters.

The offensive star of the day (no surprise) was Shayne Adams, who had six goals on nine shots (seven of them on goal). Alex Maini contributed three assists for UDM, and didn’t commit any turnovers.

For Marist, Drew Nesmith and Joseph Radin had three goals and an assist apiece. Goalie Dave Scarcello made 15 saves while allowing nine goals.

Up Next

This game ended the season – and if it had gone the other way, the narrative of the year might have been something different, like we’d seen the previous year with the Titans making the NCAA Tournament and erasing memories of an up-and-down regular season – and within a month, Titans coach Matt Holtz resigned (for unknown reasons, since the results were about in line with what you’d expect, if slightly on the disappointing side for 2014).

Moving along, I’ll decompress the season and look into the future and the Chris Kolon era.

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The Next Level: All-GLS team 2014

The second annual team consisting of the best performers in Division-1 who hailed from the state of Michigan. Any disagreements, perceived omissions, etc., feel free to debate them in the comments.

Goalie

Connor Flynn
Rockford
Freshman/Detroit

Flynn played barely more than two total games between the pipes this year (121 minutes), but that’s more than anyone else from the state played – only Penn freshman Ahmed Iftikhar, who redshirted this season, is a goalie from Michigan – and Flynn’s stats weren’t bad. He was passed by other goalies on the UDM roster after the first two games, but has potential.

Defense

Mack Gembis
Cranbrook
Junior/Michigan

Michigan’s defense wasn’t great this season – only No. 55 nationally, adjusted for schedule strength – but the Wolverines had a couple standout defensemen. Gembis was one, causing nearly five times as many turnovers (14) as he committed (three). He also had a healthy ground ball output, and didn’t commit a single penalty all season.

Joe Gifford
Notre Dame Prep
Junior/Detroit

Gifford was Detroit’s best close defenseman from in-state (and only the Wolverines and Titans played any close defenders from Michigan). He was a 14-game starter for the country’s No. 22 defense, and although he was a bit turnover-prone (eight committed), he caused opponents to be the same with 13 takeaways.

Chris Walker
Brother Rice
Sophomore/Michigan

Walker was Michigan’s most productive defender statistically (not always a good thing, since U-M’s defense overall was mediocre and it’s more important to keep opponents off the scoresheet than make it yourself). Just a sophomore, he started every game for the Maize and Blue and took on plenty of responsibility. His growth potential with more depth on D is most exciting for Wolverines fans.

Midfield

Mike Birney
Detroit Catholic Central
Junior/Detroit

Birney took a major step back after an exceptional sophomore season. He launched more shots than he did the previous season, and connected on far fewer of them (as a percentage). Part of that is because he was being relied upon to do more than he had in the previous season, but part is needing to fine-tune his shooting accuracy and picking his spots, rather than letting his 114MPH cannon speak for itself.

Scott Drummond
Birmingham Seaholm
Junior/Detroit

With Birney’s slight step back, Drummond was able to step up and become UDM’s most productive player in the midfield. He had a nice balance between scoring himself and assisting, and was more careful with the ball. Detroit’s depth is starting to build, and trotting out an impressive midfield line will help the program going forward.

Sergio Perkovic
Brother Rice
Freshman/Notre Dame

Perkovic was an every-game starter for the No. 5 offensive unit in the country, an impressive enough feat in itself. He wasn’t extremely productive individually until later in the season, but stepped up bigtime. He scored five goals in the NCAA title game, and the future is bright for a player who just accomplished what he did in his first year on the college field.

Attack

Brandon Beauregard
Notre Dame Prep
Junior/Detroit

Like many of Detroit’s offensive players, Beauregard was a bit turnover-prone, but he had a nice offensive output to balance that struggle. He had nice effort on the ride (a phase of the game Detroit used off-and-on last spring), and was the top Michigan-native attackman on the roster.

JP Forester
Brother Rice
Freshman/Richmond

Only a few Michigan natives played in the NCAA Tournament, and coming into the year you wouldn’t have expected a kid at a first-year program to be one of them. Forester started all but one game for Richmond, and was a deadly finisher (as much as the Spiders had one). He was a bit sloppy with 32 turnovers committed, but that’s to be expected when the overall talent level on the team needs to rise with more D-1 experience.

Tommy McKee
Holt
Junior/Air Force

McKee’s production took another step forward as the Academy put together the No. 12 offense in the country. His 43 points was more than anyone else in Division-1 who played high school lacrosse in Michigan. McKee’s output could have been even greater had he not missed a couple of games for the Falcons.

Specialists

Joe Kemp - Faceoff Specialist
Troy Athens
Junior/Sacred Heart

With Danny Henneghan graduating at Penn State, the Great Lax State didn’t have a top FOGO in D-1 this spring, and Kemp was the best of limited options. His .455 win rate was best on his team (wing play was clearly an issue), and he took more draws than anyone else from Michigan.

Dakota Sherman - Long-Stick Midfield
Cranbrook
Junior/Michigan

Sherman put together a nice year statistically while playing mostly LSM (he kicked back to close D on a couple occasions, if memory serves me correctly). His 12 caused turnovers were strong for a Michigan defense that didn’t rely on heavy pressure, and he even managed to get off four shots (though he didn’t score).

JD Hess - Short-Stick Defensive Midfield
Birmingham Seaholm
Redshirt Freshman/Detroit

Hess may not have been Detroit’s top Michigan-native short-stick defensive middie last year (that honor, as it has in the past, goes to Nick Garippa), but his value of the ball gives him the honor. He had better defensive statistics than Garippa – eight CTs and 17 ground balls – but also better offensive statistics with just six turnovers committed. He gets the nod.

Offensive Player of the Year

Sergio Perkovic
Brother Rice
Freshman/Notre Dame

Past recipients of this award (Air Force’s Tommy McKee and Detroit’s Mike Birney) are both still in college, but it’s time for some new blood. A Michigan native making a big impact for one of the country’s best offenses – not to discount McKee’s contributions to the Falcons’ underrated O – is exciting, and especially so when he’s a freshman. Perkovic’s best ball came at the end of the year, and if the result of the NCAA Title game had been different, he would likely have been the MVP of that game.

Defensive Player of the Year

Chris Walker
Brother Rice
Sophomore/Michigan

Michigan’s defense was no bueno, but I wouldn’t blame Walker too much. While the statistical picture only tells part of the story for close defenders (preventing your man from getting a shot doesn’t show up anywhere on the scoresheet), and U-M’s D was slow to react at times, the caliber of offenses they faced – and the adjustment period for Robbie Zonino to the college game – made things look a bit worse for the individuals than they were. Walker stuffed the sheet as much as any pole from the state, and with limited options, he takes the mantle.

Debate away. The full final stats can be seen here.

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The Next Level: 2014 Final

Our annual look at Michigan natives who are playing college lacrosse at division-1 institutions this spring. The season has snuck up on me, so getting this post up before games begin this weekend…

Air Force (11-6, 3-1 ECAC, NCAA Tournament first round)

  • Senior attack Tommy McKee (Holt) – Played in 15 of 17 games, starting 14. Scored 32 Goals on 85 Shots (53 on goal), added 11 Assists, caused three turnovers, and picked up 25 ground balls. Also committed 14 turnovers and six penalties for 5:00.

Bellarmine (7-5, 0-4 ECAC)

  • Freshman attack/midfield Graham Macko (Brother Rice) – Did not see game action.

Boston University (2-12, 2-6 Patriot League)

  • Freshman midfielder Greg Marzec (Brother Rice) – Played in four of 14 games. Won 2/3 faceoffs, picking up one ground ball, and took one Shot (on goal). Also committed one penalty for 1:00.

Canisius (7-8, 3-3 MAAC)

  • Freshman midfielder Steve Wizniuk (Warren De La Salle) – Did not see game action.

Delaware (7-9, 1-4 CAA)

  • Junior midfielder Bennett Packer (Brother Rice) – Did not see game action.

Detroit (6-8, 3-3 MAAC)

  • Junior attack Brandon Beauregard (Notre Dame Prep) – Started all 14 games. Scored 11 Goals on 46 Shots (27 on goal), added 12 Assists, caused two turnovers and picked up nine ground balls. Also committed 23 turnovers.
  • Freshman attack Kyle Beauregard (Notre Dame Prep) – Played in seven of 14 games. Took one Shot (on goal), caused one turnover and picked up seven ground balls. Also committed three turnovers.
  • Junior midfielder Mike Birney (Detroit Catholic Central) – Started all 14 games. Scored 18 Goals on 113 Shots, 49 on goal, recorded seven Assists, caused one turnover and picked up 13 ground balls. Also committed 30 turnovers and two penalties for 2:00.
  • Junior defenseman Matt Burnett (Clarkston) – Did not see game action.
  • Redshirt senior midfielder Tyler Corcoran (South Lyon) – Played in 12 of 14 games. Won 29 of 77 faceoffs, picking up 18 ground balls, and took one Shot. Also committed three turnovers.
  • Sophomore LSM Nick Demattia (Clarkston) – Played in al 14 games. Caused two turnovers and picked up one ground ball.
  • Junior midfielder Scott Drummond (Birmingham Seaholm) – Started all 14 games. Scored 17 Goals on 67 Shots (37 on goal), added 15 Assists, caused three turnovers and picked up 14 ground balls. Also committed 19 turnovers and one penalty for 0:30.
  • Redshirt freshman goalie Connor Flynn (Rockford) – Started two of 14 games. In 121:13 of game action, made 28 saves and allowed 24 goals (11.88 GAA, .538 save%), finishing with a 1-1 record. Caused one turnover and picked up 10 ground balls.
  • Senior midfielder Nick Garippa (Notre Dame Prep) – Played in 13 of 14 games. Recorded one Assist, took one Shot, caused two turnovers and picked up 13 ground balls. Went 0/2 on faceoffs. Also committed eight turnovers and three penalties for 2:00.
  • Junior defenseman Joe Gifford (Notre Dame Prep) – Started all 14 games. Caused 13 turnovers and picked up 11 ground balls. Also committed eight turnovers and one penalty for 1:00.
  • Freshman attack Alec Gilhooly (Detroit Catholic Central) – Did not see game action.
  • Freshman midfielder Ben Gjokaj (Walled Lake Central) – Played in four of 14 games. Won 5/12 faceoffs, picking up two ground balls.
  • Redshirt freshman midfielder Brad Harris (Saline) – Played in three of 14 games. Took one Shot (on goal).
  • Sophomore midfielder Andy Hebden (Brother Rice) – Played in 11 of 14 games. Scored two Goals on eight Shots (five on goal) and picked up one ground ball. Also committed three turnovers.
  • Redshirt freshman midfielder JD Hess (Birmingham Seaholm) – Played in all 14 games. Took one Shot, caused eight turnovers and picked up 17 ground balls. Also committed six turnovers and two penalties for 2:00.
  • Senior midfielder Joe MacLean (Detroit Country Day) – Played in 12 of 14 games. Took one Shot, caused one turnover, and picked up one ground ball. Also committed one turnover.
  • Freshman defenseman Bryan Matney (Ann Arbor Pioneer) – DId not see game action.
  • Sophomore attack Nick Melucci (Northville) – Played in 11 of 14 games. Took four Shots (three on goal) and picked up 11 ground balls. Also committed four turnovers.
  • Senior LSM Tim Robertson (Notre Same Prep) – Played in four of 14 games. Did not accrue any statistics.
  • Senior midfielder Drew Schupbach (Orchard Lake St. Mary’s) – Played in two of 14 games. Scored a Goal on his only Shot, caused one turnover, and picked up two ground balls. Also committed one turnover and one penalty for 0:30.
  • Junior midfielder Thomas Sible (Forest Hills Central) – Played in all 14 games. Caused four turnovers and picked up nine ground balls. Also committed seven turnovers and one penalty for 0:30.
  • Sophomore midfielder Mike Spuller (Dexter) – Played in ten games. Picked up two ground balls. Also committed two turnovers and two penalties for 4:00.
  • Senior attack Tyler Staruch (Brighton) – Played in one game. Did not accrue any statistics.
  • Freshman attack Adam Susalla (Birmingham Seaholm) – Did not see game action.
  • Senior D/LSM Mike Wenderski (UD-Jesuit) – Did not see game action.
  • Sophomore defenseman Jordan Yono (Detroit Catholic Central) – Played in 13 of 14 games, starting two. Won 8 of 27 faceoffs, picking up 20 ground balls, and caused four turnovers. Also committed six turnovers.

Georgetown (4-10, 1-5 Big East)

  • Senior midfielder Grant Fisher (Brother Rice) – Played in 12 of 14 games, starting five. Scored eight Goals on 28 Shots (16 on goal), added two assists, caused one turnover and picked up four ground balls. Also committed nine turnovers and two penalties for 2:00.

Hartford (6-9, 1-4 America East)

  • Freshman defenseman Bennett Dipzinski (Forest Hills Northern) – Did not see game action.

Marquette (6-10, 4-2 Big East)

  • Redshirt sophomore midfielder K.C. Kennedy (Brother Rice) – Played in eight of 16 games. Won 25 of 54 faceoffs (a team-best .463), picking up 13 ground balls, and took one Shot. Also committed one turnover.
  • Sophomore attack Henry Nelson (Brother Rice) – Played in 13 of 16 games. Scored two Goals on six Shots (five on goal), added two Assists, and picked up three ground balls. Also committed three turnovers.

Michigan (5-11, 1-3 ECAC)

  • Freshman midfielder Brian Archer (Brighton) – Did not see game action.
  • Junior defenseman Mack Gembis (Cranbrook) – Started 14 of 16 games. Scored a Goal on his only Shot, caused 14 turnovers, and picked up 20 ground balls. Also committed three turnovers.
  • Sophomore attack Riley Kennedy (Brother Rice) – Played in 10 of 16 games. Scored four Goals on 15 Shots (12 on goal), added three Assists, and picked up three ground balls. Also committed three turnovers.
  • Junior attack Will Meter (Brother Rice) – Played in 13 of 16 games. Scored three Goals on 18 Shots (10 on goal), added an Assist, and picked up six ground balls. Also committed five turnovers.
  • Junior midfielder Thomas Orr (Detroit Catholic Central) – Played in all 16 games. Scored a Goal on four Shots (two on goal), caused two turnovers and picked up 10 ground balls. Also committed three turnovers and six penalties for 8:00.
  • Senior midfielder Tom Sardelli (Notre Dame Prep) – Played in two of 16 games. Scord a Goal on three Shots (one on goal).
  • Senior LSM Dakota Sherman (Cranbrook) – Played in all 16 games. Took four Shots (three on goal), caused 12 turnovers, and picked up 23 ground balls. Also committed three turnovers and one penalty for 1:00.
  • Sophomore defenseman Chris Walker (Brother Rice) – Started all 16 games. Caused 10 turnovers and picked up 32 ground balls. Also committed one turnover and two penalties for 2:00.
  • Redshirt junior defenseman Max Zwolan (Ann Arbor Pioneer) – Played in two of 16 games. Caused one turnover and picked up one ground ball.

Notre Dame (12-6, 2-3 ACC, NCAA Finalist)

  • Freshman midfielder Sergio Perkovic (Brother Rice) – Started all 18 games. Scored 28 Goals on 94 Shots (59 on goal), added five assists, caused one turnover, and picked up 16 ground balls. Also committed 11 turnovers and three penalties for 1:30.

Ohio State (6-8, 3-1 ECAC)

  • Senior midfielder Nick Diegel (Northville) – Played in three of 14 games. Took one Shot on goal and recorded one Assist. Also committed one turnover.

Penn (11-4, 4-2 Ivy League, NCAA Tournament first round)

  • Freshman goalie Ahmed Iftikhar (Detroit Country Day) – Did not see game action.

Richmond (6-11, 2-3 Atlantic Sun, NCAA play-in game)

  • Freshman attack J.P. Forester (Brother Rice) – Played in all 17 games, starting 16. Scored 28 Goals on 95 Shots (60 on goal), added three Assists, caused one turnovers, and picked up 24 ground balls. Also committed 32 turnovers and four penalties for 2:00.

Robert Morris (5-9, 204 NEC)

  • Freshman attack Kento Nakano (Rockford) – Scored a Goal on two Shots (both on goal) and picked up one ground ball.

Rutgers (8-8, 3-3 Big East)

  • Sophomore midfielder Jacob Coretti (East Grand Rapids) – Played in seven of 16 games. Recorded three Assists and took three Shots (two on goal). Also committed four turnovers.

Sacred Heart (6-9, 4-2 NEC)

  • Junior midfielder Joe Kemp (Troy Athens) – Played in 11 of 15 games, starting eight. Won 71 of 156 faceoffs (a team-best .455), picking up 43 ground balls, scored a Goal on seven Shots (five on goal), and notched three Assists. Also committed seven turnovers.

St. John’s (7-7, 3-3 Big East)

  • Freshman midfielder David Stafford (Mattawan) – Did not see game action.

VMI (2-12, 1-4 Atlantic Sun)

  • Junior midfielder Andrew Erber (Dexter) – Played in all 14 games, starting six. Scored two Goals on 26 Shots, added an Assist, caused one turnover and picked up 13 ground balls. Also committed 11 turnovers and three penalties for 2:00.

Yale (9-5, 3-3 Ivy League)

  • Freshman midfielder John Lazarsfeld (Ann Arbor Greenhills) – Played in three of 14 games. Went 0/1 on faceoffs and picked up two ground balls.

Corrections, discussion, etc. in the comments. Up next: the All-GLS team 2014.

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The Next Level: July 20, 2014

Hey, so the season has been over for a couple months now, yeah? The final set of games since last I updated the performances of Michigan natives playing D-1 lacrosse…

Air Force 14, Ohio State 7 (ECAC Tournament)

  • Senior attack Tommy McKee (Holt) – Started, scored two Goals on three Shots, added an Assist, and picked up a ground ball. Also committed two turnovers and one penalty for 1:00.

Air Force 9, Fairfield 8 (ECAC Tournament)

  • Senior attack Tommy McKee (Holt) – Started, recorded two Assists, took six Shots, and picked up three ground balls. Also committed one turnover.

Air Force 13, Richmond 5 (NCAA play-in game)

  • Senior attack Tommy McKee (Holt) – Started, scored two Goals on seven Shots (five on goal), and picked up three ground balls. Also committed one turnover.

Air Force 9, Duke 20 (NCAA Tournament)

  • Senior attack Tommy McKee (Holt) - Started, scored two Goals on seven Shots, picked up four ground balls, and caused one turnover. Also committed three turnovers and one penalty for 1:00.

Boston University 11, Duke 16

  • Freshman midfielder Greg Marzec (Brother Rice) – Won his only faceoff attempt.

Canisius 11, Siena 14 (MAAC Tournament)

  • Freshman midfielder Steve Wizniuk (Warren De La Salle) – Did not see game action.

Detroit 9, Marist 11 (MAAC Tournament)

  • Junior attack Brandon Beauregard (Notre Dame Prep) – Started and scored a Goal on four Shots (all on goal). Also committed three turnovers.
  • Freshman attack Kyle Beauregard (Notre Dame Prep) – Played, but did not accrue any statistics.
  • Junior midfielder Mike Birney (Detroit Catholic Central) – Started and scored a Goal on seven Shots (five on goal). Also committed one turnover.
  • Junior defenseman Matt Burnett (Clarkston) – Did not see game action.
  • Redshirt senior midfielder Tyler Corcoran (South Lyon) – Went 0/3 on faceoffs.
  • Sophomore LSM Nick Demattia (Clarkston) – Played, but did not accrue any statistics.
  • Junior midfielder Scott Drummond (Birmingham Seaholm) – Started and scored a Goal on four Shots (all on goal).
  • Redshirt freshman goalie Connor Flynn (Rockford) – Did not see game action.
  • Senior midfielder Nick Garippa (Notre Dame Prep) – Picked up one ground ball.
  • Junior defenseman Joe Gifford (Notre Dame Prep) – Started, but did not accrue any statistics.
  • Freshman attack Alec Gilhooly (Detroit Catholic Central) – Did not see game action.
  • Freshman midfielder Ben Gjokaj (Walled Lake Central) – Did not see game action.
  • Redshirt freshman midfielder Brad Harris (Saline) – Did not see game action.
  • Sophomore midfielder Andy Hebden (Brother Rice) – Took one Shot on goal.
  • Redshirt freshman midfielder JD Hess (Birmingham Seaholm) – Picked up one ground ball.
  • Senior midfielder Joe MacLean (Detroit Country Day) – Did not see game action.
  • Freshman defenseman Bryan Matney (Ann Arbor Pioneer) – Did not see game action.
  • Sophomore attack Nick Melucci (Northville) – Picked up two ground balls.
  • Senior LSM Tim Robertson (Notre Same Prep) – Did not see game action.
  • Senior midfielder Drew Schupbach (Orchard Lake St. Mary’s) – Did not see game action.
  • Junior midfielder Thomas Sible (Forest Hills Central) – Picked up one ground ball.
  • Sophomore midfielder Mike Spuller (Dexter) – Played, but did not accrue any statistics.
  • Senior attack Tyler Staruch (Brighton) – Did not see game action.
  • Freshman attack Adam Susalla (Birmingham Seaholm) – Did not see game action.
  • Senior D/LSM Mike Wenderski (UD-Jesuit) – Did not see game action.
  • Sophomore defenseman Jordan Yono (Detroit Catholic Central) – Picked up two ground balls.

Marquette 6, Villanova 9 (Big East Tournament)

  • Redshirt sophomore midfielder K.C. Kennedy (Brother Rice) – Did not see game action.
  • Sophomore attack Henry Nelson (Brother Rice) – Played, but did not accrue any statistics.

Michigan 5, Fairfield 12 (ECAC Tournament)

  • Freshman midfielder Brian Archer (Brighton) – Took one Shot.
  • Junior defenseman Mack Gembis (Cranbrook) – Started, but did not accrue any statistics.
  • Sophomore attack Riley Kennedy (Brother Rice) – Scored a Goal on two Shots (both on goal). Also committed two turnovers.
  • Junior attack Will Meter (Brother Rice) – Played, but did not accrue any statistics.
  • Junior midfielder Thomas Orr (Detroit Catholic Central) – Picked up one ground ball.
  • Senior midfielder Tom Sardelli (Notre Dame Prep) – Did not see game action.
  • Senior LSM Dakota Sherman (Cranbrook) – Took one Shot on goal and picked up one ground ball.
  • Sophomore defenseman Chris Walker (Brother Rice) – Started and picked up two ground balls.
  • Redshirt junior defenseman Max Zwolan (Ann Arbor Pioneer) – Did not see game action.

Notre Dame 18, Army 17

  • Freshman midfielder Sergio Perkovic (Brother Rice) – Started, scored two Goals on five Shots (three on goal), added an Assist, and picked up two ground balls. Also committed one turnover.

Notre Dame 13, Harvard 5 (NCAA Tournament)

  • Freshman midfielder Sergio Perkovic (Brother Rice) – Started, scored two Goals on six Shots (three on goal), and picked up one ground ball. Also committed one turnover and one penalty for 0:30.

Notre Dame 14, Albany 13 (OT) (NCAA Tournament)

  • Freshman midfielder Sergio Perkovic (Brother Rice) – Started, scored two Goals on five Shots (three on goal), and picked up one ground ball. Also committed one turnover.

Notre Dame 11, Maryland 6 (NCAA Final Four)

  • Freshman midfielder Sergio Perkovic (Brother Rice) – Started, recorded one Assists, took four Shots (all on goal), and picked up two ground balls. Also committed two turnovers.

Notre Dame 9, Duke 11 (NCAA Title game)

  • Freshman midfielder Sergio Perkovic (Brother Rice) - Started and scored five Goals on nine Shots (eight on goal).

Ohio State 7, Air Force 14 (ECAC Tournament)

  • Senior midfielder Nick Diegel (Northville) – Took one Shot.

Penn 11, Cornell 10 (Ivy League Tournament)
Penn 7, Harvard 5 (Ivy League Tournament)
Penn 11, Drexel 16 (NCAA Tournament)

  • Freshman goalie Ahmed Iftikhar (Detroit Country Day) – Did not see game action.

Richmond 14, Mercer 6 (Atlantic Sun Tournament)

  • Freshman attack J.P. Forester (Brother Rice) – Scored two Goals on four Shots (three on goal), added two assists, and picked up one ground ball. Also committed one turnover and one penalty for 0:30.

Richmond 8, High Point 7 (Atlantic Sun Tournament)

  • Freshman attack J.P. Forester (Brother Rice) – Started and took four Shots (three on goal). Also committed two turnovers.

Richmond 5, Air Force 13 (NCAA play-in game)

  • Freshman attack J.P. Forester (Brother Rice) – Started and scored a Goal on three Shots (all on goal). Also committed four turnovers.

Rutgers 7, Denver 14 (Big East Tournament)

  • Sophomore midfielder Jacob Coretti (East Grand Rapids) – Did not see game action.

Sacred Heart 8, Bryant 12 (NEC Tournament)

  • Junior midfielder Joe Kemp (Troy Athens) – Went 0/5 on faceoffs.

Yale 9, Harvard 10

  • Freshman midfielder John Lazarsfeld (Ann Arbor Greenhills) – Did not see game action.

Corrections, comments, discussion, and scorelines from other divisions can be shared in the comments.

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Scores and Schedule: May 12, 2014

Haven’t been able to provide consistent updates here (obviously). Trying to get back on track soon.

Wednesday’s Scores

Division-3 Men

Adrian 13, Aurora 22

Collegiate Club Women

Michigan 9, Towson 8

High School Boys

Ann Arbor Gabriel Richard 14, Madison Heights Bishop Foley 10
Ann Arbor Skyline 17, Temperance Bedford 4
Brighton 17, Huron Valley-Lakeland 5
Tecumseh 16, Chelsea 5
Grosse Pointe South 17, Warren De La Salle 8
Dexter 17, Grosse Ile 3
Bay City Central 7, Houghton Lake 4
Howell 10, Waterford 3
Ypsilanti Lincoln 8, Belleville 7
Saline 14, Ann Arbor Huron 5
South Lyon 17, Walled Lake Western 3
Hartland 12, Walled Lake Central 2
Grand Blanc @ Walled Lake Northern

High School Girls

Grand Rapids Catholic Central 13, Forest Hills United 8
Hartland 16, Brighton 15 (OT)
Grand Haven 18, Comstock Park 2
Cranbrook-Kingswood 16, Detroit Country Day 2
East Lansing 25, Lansing Waverly 4
Birmingham United 12, Grosse Pointe South 8
Huron Valley United 6, Grand Blanc 6
Williamston-Haslett 17, DeWitt 0
DeWitt 14, Holt 7
Grand Rapids Christian 18, Hudsonville 4
Lake Orion 8, Rochester Adams 5
Rochester 19, Farmington Hills Harrison 11
Plymouth 16, Northville 11
Portage Northern 8, Mishawaka (Ind.) Penn 9 (2OT)
East Grand Rapids 11, Rockford 10
South Lyon United 7, Salem 3
Rochester Hills Stoney Creek 9, Farmington 7
Tecumseh 9, Sylvania (Ohio) Southview 20
Troy 10, Troy Athens 9
Waterford United 9, Walled Lake United 8
West Bloomfield 17, Oxford 14
Northview 7, Holland West Ottawa 6
Ann Arbor Skyline @ Temperance Bedford

Thursday’s Scores

Collegiate Club Women

Michigan 9, Pittsburgh 11
Oakland 6, UNC Club 12

High School Boys

Auburn Hills Avondale 12, Detroit Southeastern 2
Comstock Park 10, Hudsonville 7
DeWitt 8, Lansing Waverly 4
West Bloomfield 8, Farmington North-Harrison 6
Grand Rapids Catholic Central 8, Forest Hills Eastern 3
Forest Hills Northern 19, Holland West Ottawa 7
Flint Powers 11, Davison 7
Forest Hills Central 16, East Grand Rapids 13
Grand Rapids Christian 6, Northview 3
Holland Christian 14, Caledonia 6
Holt 16, Grand Ledge 2
Bay City Western 16, Saginaw Heritage 6
Lake Orion 13, Bloomfield Hills 6
Spring Lake 11, Lowell 10
Midland 18, Bay City Central 1
Cranbrook 16, Pontiac Notre Dame Prep 7
Novi 13, Canton 11
Battle Creek Pennfield 16, Battle Creek Lakeview 7
Mattawan 13, Portage Northern 12
Portage Central 20, Kalamazoo United 3
Rochester Adams 15, Rochester 5
Clarkston 19, Rochester Hills Stoney Creek 4
L’Anse Creuse North 9, Romeo 7
Ann Arbor Greenhills 11, Royal Oak Shrine 2
Royal Oak 10, Oxford 3
Grandville 14, Muskegon Reeths-Puffer 3
Ann Arbor Pioneer 7, Sylvania (Ohio) Southview 12
Troy 11, Troy Athens 10
Utica Eisenhower 19, L’Anse Creuse 5
Utica Stevenson 15, Port Huron United 8
Madison Heights Bishop Foley 15, Warren Cousino 5
Haslett-Williamston 16, East Lansing 1
Warren Mott-Sterling Heights 17, Utica 2
Zeeland 20, Grand Rapids South Christian 2

High School Girls

Flint Powers 17, Flushing 2
Hartland 24, Waterford United 4
Okemos 18, Ann Arbor Skyline 2
South Lyon United 7, Novi 4

Friday’s Scores

Collegiate Club Women

Michigan 5, Georgia 15
Oakland 11, Cortland Club 8
Oakland 11, Denver Club 9

High School Boys

Ann Arbor Skyline 8, Saline 8
Tecumseh 9, Temperance Bedford 0
Rochester Adams 10, Bloomfield Hills 7
Dexter 16, Chelsea 6
Forest Hills Northern 13, Brighton 5
Grosse Pointe North 9, Orchard Lake St. Mary’s 4
Huron Valley-Lakeland 8, Grand Blanc 7
Bay City Western 7, Lapeer, West-East 4
South Lyon 10, Northville 8
Birmingham 18, Rochester Hills Stoney Creek 2
Davison 14, Swartz Creek 6
West Bloomfield 13, Warren Mott-Sterling Heights 11
Plymouth 8, Walled Lake Western 7
Ann Arbor Pioneer @ Ann Arbor Huron
Henry Ford II @ L’Anse Creuse North

Friday’s Scores

Ann Arbor Pioneer 16, Forest Hills United 11
Ann Arbor Huron 14, Dexter 10
Caledonia 10, Lake Forest (Ill.) 6
Williamston-Haslett 10, East Lansing 9
Mattawan United 17, Kalamazoo Central 5
Midland Dow 11, Lake Orion 7
Rochester Hills Stoney Creek 10, Farmington Hills Harrison 9
Okemos 18, DeWitt 3
Rochester 18, Grosse Pointe University Liggett 4
Huron Valley United 16, Walled Lake United 7
Bloomfield Hills @ Detroit Country Day
Ann Arbor Skyline @ Saline
Temperance Bedford @ Tecumseh

Saturday’s Scores

Division-3 Women

Adrian 14, Augustana 22

Collegiate Club Women

Michigan 15, UC Santa Barbara 19
Oakland 7, Utah 14

High School Boys

Canton 11, Ann Arbor Huron 6
Ann Arbor Skyline 15, Toledo (Ohio) St. John’s 4
Brother Rice 12, Detroit Catholic Central 8
Clarkston 21, Lake Orion 4
East Grand Rapids 7, Detroit Country Day 6
Grand Ledge 10, East Lansing 5
Utica Eisenhower 14, Grosse Pointe North 6
Grand Haven 14, Holland Christian 7
Grandville 12, Hudsonville 5
GrandRapids Catholic Central 18, Kalamazoo United 4
Petoskey 4, Mattawan 3
Pontiac Notre Dame Prep 9, Ann Arbor Gabriel Richard 4
Novi 10, Troy Athens 6
Okemos 17, DeWitt 4
Oxford 14, Bay City Western 2
Salem 8, Plymouth 7
Romeo 15, Rochester 11
Midland 14, Rockford 10
Zeeland 18, Muskegon Reeths-Puffer 0
Portage Central 12, Spring Lake 11 (OT)
Monroe St. Mary-Catholic Central 12, Ypsilanti Lincoln 6
Troy 14, Royal Oak 5
Henry Ford II 15, Anchor Bay Fairview 3
Walled Lake Western 13, Walled Lake Northern 8
Haslett-Williamston 13, Holt 5

High School Girls

Caledonia 14, Brighton 6
Caledonia 12, Bloomfield Hills 11
Novi 14, Canton 11
Bloomfield Hills 9, Grand Rapids Catholic Central 5
Grand Rapids Catholic Central 11, Brighton 5
East Grand Rapids 16, Ann Arbor Pioneer 5
East Grand Rapids 13, Lake Forest (Ill.) 7
Grand Rapids Christian 20, Mattawan United 11
Grand Haven 12, Portage Northern 11 (2OT)
Ann Arbor Pioneer 8, Lake Forest (Ill.) 9
Bloomfield Hills Marian 15, Sacred Heart Academy 13
Midland Dow 14, Dexter 11
Livonia Ladywood 19, Pontiac Notre Dame Prep 8
Oxford @ Saginaw Heritage

Today’s Schedule

Collegiate Club Men

Grand Valley State v. Montana State @ UC-Irvine
Michigan State v. Texas @ UC-Irvine

High School Boys

Novi @ Brighton
Grosse Pointe University Liggett @ Detroit Southeastern
Ann Arbor Greenhills @ East Lansing
Farmington @ Farmington North-Harrison
Northville @ Hartland
Salem @ Huron Valley-Lakeland
South Lyon @ Howell
Saline @ Ypsilanti Lincoln
Davison @ Lapeer West-East
Portage Northern @ Mattawan
Battle Creek Pennfield @ Portage Central
Anchor Bay Fairview @ Port Huron United
Rochester Hills Stoney Creek @ Rochester
Grosse Pointe South @ Romeo
Bay City Central @ St. Clair United
Saginaw Heritage @ Swartz Creek
Temperance Bedford @ Tecumseh
Clarkston @ Troy
Auburn Hills Avondale @ Henry Ford II
Kalamazoo United @ Vicksburg
Plymouth @ Walled Lake Central

High School Girls

Bloomfield Hills Marian @ Ann Arbor Huron
Tecumseh @ Temperance Bedford
Bloomfield Hills @ Birmingham United
Flint Powers @ Flint Carman-Ainsworth
Rockford @ Caledonia
Lowell @ Comstock Park
Lansing Waverly @ East Grand Rapids
Farmington Hills Harrison @ Farmington
Grandville @ Grand Rapids Christian
Northview @ Grand Haven
Cranbrook-Kingswood @ Livonia Ladywood
Swartz Creek @ Lake Orion
Oxford @ Midland Dow
Farmington Hills Mercy @ Pontiac Notre Dame Prep
Williamston-Haslett @ Okemos
Ann Arbor Pioneer @ Sacred Heart Academy
West Bloomfield @ Saginaw Heritage
Ann Arbor Gabriel Richard @ Saline
Hartland @ Salem
Rochester Adams @ Rochester Hills Stoney Creek
Clarkston @ Troy Athens
Hudsonville @ Holland West Ottawa

Corrections, omissions, etc. always appreciated in the comments. Also use the comments for discussion of today’s action.

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